Saturday, 23 June 2018

Toroa construction continued. Ama construction.




Mike adding line markings for the position of bulkheads on the pre-cut ama sides.
this ama design in stitch and tape 4mm 5 ply was derived from a 1/10th scale cardboard model.

Bulkhead positions marked.
Mike fitting copper wire ties along the ama keel line.
Fully tied with copper ties the two halves are spread.


Diamond shaped bulkheads form the structure, inwale stringer allows the deck some fastening surface.

Toroa's ama taking shape.






Ama completed and dry fitted to kiato (outrigger beams).

We decided on this colour scheme based on the green of Polynesia, the red white and blue tricolour of our respective ancestry, French and Dutch.

Showing the trampoline and ama lashing.




Toroa on launch day at Waiake Beach Auckland 2000.

Original rig layout on starboard tack. We removed the bow dash boards in favour of a new tacking line system which saw the tack of the sail run below the gunwale from end to end. By this time we had also levelled the sheer-line somewhat and attached a lee rail dash board to stop the sail tack from hopping up over the deck during mid shunt, as the mast came to perpendicular before dropping into its new forward leaning position.

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Toroa by Harmen Hielkema & Mike Toy.

Header Photo: Toroa at Rawene by Julie Holton.

This blog is dedicated to the memory of my father Roelof Hielkema who instilled in me the willingness to learn.
These pages are intended to inform and add to the growing body of knowledge concerning the Canoe Culture of the Pacific, past, present & future, from the Tupuna, the Ancestors of the Pacific cultures to the people of the world.

These pages contain Images and text relating to our two proas, Toroa & Takapu, some history relating to our experiments & experiences.

The dissertation that I posted on this blog in April 2008 "Takapu The Proa" was written by me in 1997 in response to an assignment that I was set whilst studying for my design degree. The dissertation covers many issues that a proa enthusiast may benefit from reading about.

Waka define culture as culture defines waka

Waka reflect the individuality and uniqueness of a society which in turn is governed by the geography, geology, topography, climate, location, resources, isolation, origin, flora, fauna, flotsam, jetsam, etc.

Waka are our link to the past, they have shaped our present and define our future.

Waka are the vessels of knowledge, physical and mental development, freedom of bondage to the land, key to our inquisitiveness, expressions of our ingenuity and courage, our love of shape and form, the seat of our power.

Waka are the source of our material culture, from which all processes are derived.

Waka are who and what we are.